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Local Expert Blog: Be Scared & Do It Anyway!

Local Expert Blog: Be Scared & Do It Anyway! “Be Scared and Do it Anyway!” by Sara Bown I am somewhat ashamed to admit that when the pandemic was first declared I thought, “Here we go again,” and largely thought it was “just another flu”.  I can also say that my thoughts have changed!  At the time, I was working for a General and Thoracic Surgeon here in Windsor, and when HE stopped coming in and cut the office hours down to once a week and phone follow-ups, I started to pay attention! I have spent most of my 40 years here on earth running away from myself, and when the government said that I had no choice but to stay home with me, myself and I, as long as we were all from the same household, I was petrified.  I was about 18 months into a good solid recovery from alcohol addiction and I thought, what I am going to do without seeing people that care about me, going to support meetings and distracting myself with friends. I was terrified of relapsing without my caring support network, and my disease was happy to start…

Expert Blog: Caring for Caregivers Conference - Research in Action

Expert Blog: Caring for Caregivers Conference - Research in Action Caregivers often go unnoticed, caring behind the scenes.  They are key contributors to our healthcare systems function. Supporting them is critical. This is what we learned from a WE-SPARK Health Institute funded grant: Caring for the Caregiver Study. Led by primary investigators Dr. Edward Cruz, a University of Windsor nursing professor, and Dr. Jennifer Voth, a Hôtel-Dieu Grace Healthcare research associate, the study involved a survey of over 75 individuals and 21 interviews with local caregivers. This study originated through Hôtel-Dieu Grace Healthcare’s Mental Health and Addictions Patient and Family Advisory Council, under the direction of director Patrick Kolowicz. The caregivers shared how deeply impacted they are by their experiences, how their health and well-being is so closely related to that of their loved-one’s, and how hard it can be at times navigating the mental health and addictions healthcare system. It demonstrated the critical role caregivers play in supporting…

Medical vs. Cotton Masks

Medical vs. Cotton Masks Rebecca Rudman has been making masks since the start of the pandemic. The founder of the Windsor Essex Sewing Force knows that there is a lot of confusion about masks and concerns about allergies. With cotton masks now being widely available, there could also be some confusion about the differences between cotton masks and medical 2-ply or N95 masks and how and where they should be used.  Some people with allergies can face some troubles with facial masks. “I would suggest talking to your family doctor because without a lot of research on cloth masks it’s hard to get widespread endorsement,” said Rudman Ken Drouillard, a professor at the University of Windsor School of Environmental Studies has explained the differences during a live meeting hosted by the We Spark Health Institute on October 6, 2021 Medical masks are called many names. surgical mask, isolation mask, dental mask, procedural mask, etc. Medical masks are only able to be used as a one-time mask…

Local Expert Blog: 3 Tips for Caregiver Well-being

Local Expert Blog: 3 Tips for Caregiver Well-being Dr. Anne McLachlan, C.Psych Advocating for and supporting a family member with a severe mental health disorder and/or substance use can be rewarding, challenging, and at times, emotionally and physically draining. At times they may be well, taking their medications, looking after themselves and their home, attending meetings or groups, and at other times, they may be unwell, neglecting themselves, perhaps not eating well, using substances, and avoiding family and friends. Family members can get so focused on providing support that they neglect their own physical and mental health.  As well, being constantly exposed to another person’s emotional pain and trying to relieve their suffering can lead to caregiver fatigue.  According to the Centre for Addictions and Mental Health, signs of caregiver fatigue include:  feelings of helplessness and powerlessness in the face of our relative’s suffering; reduced feelings of empathy; sleep problems; irritability; sadness, anxiety or anger;…

Position dedicated to integrating med students in local research

Position dedicated to integrating med students in local research Devinder Moudgil is the WE-Spark Health Institute’s first medical student research associate. In her new role as medical student research associate at the WE-Spark Health Institute, Devinder Moudgil will engage the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry – Windsor Campus in integrating its students into the local research ecosystem. “I am excited to join the passionate WE-Spark team members who take immense pride in transforming the health research landscape of the Windsor-Essex region,” says Dr. Moudgil. “My commitment to engaging students in research stems from my own research experiences, and I remain passionate about continuing this journey and inspiring young and emerging students.” A scientist by training, Moudgil has a doctoral degree in oncology from the University of Alberta. She joins WE-Spark from the UWindsor Office of Research and Innovation, where she supported new technology protection and commercialization processes. Moudgil will promote research opportunities…

Breast cancer research focused on proteins in natural killer cells

Breast cancer research focused on proteins in natural killer cells Biochemistry professor Munir Rahim has been awarded a $120,000 grant from the Cancer Research Society to study how breast cancer interacts with receptors on the surface of immune cells.   UWindsor’s Munir Rahim is launching ground-breaking research that could lead to new treatments for breast cancer. A professor of biomedical science, Dr. Rahim is trying to unlock the mystery of how breast cancer outfoxes the body’s immune system. Collaborating with Caroline Hamm of the Windsor Regional Cancer Centre, Rahim believes new treatments may lie in how breast cancer interacts with specific proteins, called receptors, on the surface of immune cells. “We are looking into the mechanisms that inhibit immune cells,” Rahim said. “This is brand new research. This receptor has not been studied in breast cancer.” Rahim has been awarded a $120,000 research grant through the Cancer Research Society, a registered charity that raises money for Canadian cancer research, in partnership with the…

Update to address effectiveness of medical vs. homemade masks

Update to address effectiveness of medical vs. homemade masks The COVID-19 pandemic caused shortages for certified personal protective equipment needed by healthcare workers, and hospitals communicated their need for homemade masks that could be used in non-critical areas of operations for inpatients. The Windsor-Essex Sewing Force, a community volunteer network, implemented a testing and quality control program to optimize production of high-quality homemade masks for donation to Windsor-Essex health care institutions. Professor Ken Drouillard of the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research and School of the Environment is the lead researcher on the project, funded by the University of Windsor’s Office of Research and Innovation and the WE-Spark Health Institute. Dr. Drouillard will share an update on the effectiveness of these cloth masks on Wednesday, Oct. 6, at 7 p.m. Click here to register. Courtesy: https://www.uwindsor.ca/dailynews/2021-10-04/update-address-effectiveness-medical-vs-homemade-masks

Donation to advance urban studies work

Donation to advance urban studies work Richard and Colleen Peddie have donated $12,000 to support the Windsor Law Centre for Cities. A $12,000 donation from former Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment president Richard Peddie (BComm 1970, honorary LLD 2001) and his wife, Colleen, will allow the Windsor Law Centre for Cities to continue to develop its research, teaching, and public engagement on the legal and policy tools related to municipalities and local institutions. “This support from the Peddies is an important boost for the Centre for Cities,” says its director, law professor Anneke Smit. Launched in 2019, the centre has conducted research focused on affordable housing policy and innovation, municipal climate action, municipal governance under states of emergency, and policy tools for inclusive city-building and public participation. The centre also collaborates with AM800 for a weekly radio segment with host Dan Macdonald on good city-building. The gift will support its work during the 2021-22 academic year, Dr.…

Prostate cancer research gets two-year funding boost

Prostate cancer research gets two-year funding boost John Trant has been awarded a $120,000 grant through the Cancer Research Society to devise a new way to diagnose prostate cancer.   Oncologists may soon have a new tool to outsmart prostate cancer thanks to research by UWindsor biochemistry professor John Trant. Dr. Trant is developing imaging agents to help oncologists distinguish between different types of prostate cancer. The agents would offer better, quicker, and cheaper diagnoses than current imaging techniques. “We are developing the next generation of imaging probes so clinicians can quickly determine the location of the tumour and help determine if the cancer is progressing from one stage to another,” Trant said. “Early detection of cancer is one of the driving forces behind increased survival, however, with prostate cancer, just as it is important to learn if cancer is present, it is important to know if the cancer is changing.” Trant’s research got a $120,000 funding boost last week from the Cancer Research Society,…

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