News

Alumni honour professors as excellent educators

Alumni honour professors as excellent educators The University of Windsor Alumni Association is bestowing its Alumni Award for Distinguished Contributions to University Teaching on four professors during Spring Convocation ceremonies. The award honours faculty members — nominated by colleagues, alumni, and students — as incentive and encouragement for achieving excellence in teaching and learning at the University of Windsor. This year’s recipients included Dr. Dora Cavallo-Medved, a cell biologist in the Faculty of Science. Dr. Cavallo-Medved has shared her love of science with numerous University of Windsor students. Her approachable manner and her belief in making strong classroom connections have contributed to the personal growth, success, and self-confidence of her students. Dr. Cavallo-Medved is known for her devotion to teaching and research, and her positive work has spread throughout campus. She works collaboratively with other faculties and students in a variety of disciplines. No matter the program, she can engage…

Amplify: Women are taking their sexual health into their own hands

Amplify: Women are taking their sexual health into their own hands Huge strides are happening in sex ed, including a groundbreaking program for university-age women on consent, good relationships, sexual health and desire. A University of Windsor team led by psychology professor Charlene Senn developed the program, now being adapted for a high school audience. "I sat in on two days of sessions with 16- and 17-year-old girls: It was an illuminating experience for a 40-year-old and made me regret never receiving anything close to this caliber of sex ed as a teen". This Globe & Mail Article talks about Dr. Charlene Senn's research, The Bystander Program, and how she is now adapting it for use in high schools. Read the article here: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-amplify-women-are-taking-their-sexual-health-into-their-own-hands/?fbclid=IwAR2kREqYPeTn8IPMftJbbJ-4NLQgjqQJMTkWC6zWiqplr-TuI9yYVs9mFoE

COVID-19 aftermath: long-haulers suffer while so much remains unknown

COVID-19 aftermath: long-haulers suffer while so much remains unknown Domenic Scandale is shown at his Windsor home on Thursday, June 3, 2021. Scandale got COVID-19 in December 2020 and then remained hospitalized until April because of long-term impacts. PHOTO BY DAN JANISSE /Windsor Star   Just days after Domenic Scandale tested positive for COVID-19 in mid-December, he collapsed in his bathroom around 1 a.m., unable to catch his breath. “I almost passed out, I couldn’t breathe,” he recalled. “I told my wife, ‘call an ambulance.’” But in the back of the ambulance, Scandale, 55, had no idea of the endless nightmare ahead — one that repeatedly almost claimed his life. To this day, his health is debilitated in several ways. “I was thinking they will take me in, give me some oxygen and I’m coming back home that night,” he said. “I never imagined this.” What Scandale didn’t realize was how dangerously low his oxygen levels had dropped. “Everything happened so fast. If I wouldn’t have went when I did, I don’t think I would…

UWindsor research team joins province-wide COVID wastewater project

UWindsor research team joins province-wide COVID wastewater project Mike McKay and his team at the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research are part of province-wide effort to analyze wastewater for COVID.   Researcher Mike McKay of the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research and his team will be part of a first-of-its-kind province-wide SARS-CoV-2 wastewater surveillance project announced yesterday and supported by Ontario Genomics, Genome Canada, and the biotech company Illumina. Dr. McKay will collaborate with Ontario Genomics, University of Guelph, University of Ottawa, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, and others to analyze COVID-19 in wastewater to improve public health response and better understand outbreaks in communities across Ontario. The project will enhance critical province-wide co-ordination and viral surveillance and support provincial and national efforts to understand how the virus that causes COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, is changing over time through emerging variants, including variants of concern. The virus responsible…

Science alumni event going virtual

Science alumni event going virtual Alumni of the Faculty of Science will gather for talks, trivia, and team spirit on Thursday, June 10.   A new event called “Science Leads the Way” aims to virtually gather science alumni for talks, trivia, and team spirit on Thursday, June 10, at 7 p.m. In the absence of in-person parties, the Faculty of Science and the Department of Alumni Affairs joined forces to create a science-themed evening of entertainment that could be enjoyed online. The one-hour event features two guest speakers: Lisa Porter, biomedical health sciences, will explore the role science has played during the pandemic in her talk, “The Pandemic Paradox: Trusting Science During a Health Crisis.” Dan Mennill, integrative biology, will discuss a species of toad that changes its colour for one day each year as well as how his team used lifelike robotic models to learn more about the mysterious toads in a presentation entitled “Toads and the Colour-Changing Frogs of Costa Rica.” In addition to two lightning…

Economic impact of UWindsor “dramatic and transformative,” says report

Economic impact of UWindsor “dramatic and transformative,” says report The University of Windsor continues to have a dramatic economic impact on the region and the nation, according to a new study by financial services firm KPMG.   The University of Windsor continues to have a dramatic and transformative economic impact on the region, the province, and at a national level, according to a new study by financial services firm KPMG. A recent Economic Impact Assessment concluded that as all universities prepare for future challenges, “UWindsor is uniquely placed to be a front-runner in meeting these challenges. This reflects its unique location at a major border and the depth and breadth of its educational programming.” KPMG also points out that UWindsor is an active and important stakeholder in the Windsor-Essex region through the education and training of its students, and has contributed to the productivity and growth of the local economy by: Supporting local businesses in educating and providing a skilled labour force for the region, and investing nearly…

Engineering professor takes on role as acting associate VP academic

Engineering professor takes on role as acting associate VP academic Edwin Tam will begin a term of up to two years as acting associate vice-president, academic, effective July 1.   Acting provost Patti Weir announced Monday the appointment of Edwin Tam as acting associate vice-president, academic, effective July 1 for a term of up to two years. Dr. Tam is an associate professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the Faculty of Engineering and served as its assistant dean, student affairs from 2007 to 2018. In this position, he oversaw and promoted first-year engineering, developed and maintained support services and counselling for academic related concerns, and oversaw engineering recruitment initiatives. Courtesy: https://www.uwindsor.ca/dailynews/2021-05-31/engineering-professor-takes-role-acting-associate-vp-academic

Research project working to tackle microplastics pollution at source

Research project working to tackle microplastics pollution at source Jill Crossman is co-ordinating a multidisciplinary team developing new tools to test, analyze, and track microplastics pollution.   UWindsor researchers and institutional partners are tackling microplastics pollution at its source. Researchers must solve the mystery of where microplastics originate, as well as how they travel and where they end up, before the major international pollution problem can be curtailed. Jill Crossman, a professor in the School of the Environment, is co-ordinating a million-dollar multidisciplinary, multi-institutional project to develop new tools to test, analyze, and track Ontario’s microplastics pollution. “There are severe knowledge gaps limiting our ability to track plastics already in the environment and these gaps remain a key roadblock to efficient policy implementation,” says Dr. Crossman. Crossman, along with UWindsor researchers Scott Mundle, Bulent Mutus, James Gauld, and Simon Rondeau-Gagné, and colleagues from partner universities, have…

Go grey in May for brain tumour awareness

Go grey in May for brain tumour awareness Natalie Galarnyk holding a photo of her sister Katrina Photo credit: CTV News Windsor   “Katrina otherwise known as Kat. She was the life of the party. The most contagious laugh. Biggest smile,” says Natalie Galarnyk. Natalie Galarnyk’s sister Katrina was diagnosed with stage four glioblastoma multiforme brain cancer at age 19. Katrina was 21 when she died. “It’s more about us being able to help other families that went through or going through similar situations. We were so fortunate to have family so close and have family members all over Canada come and visit us and support us, but a lot of people don’t have that,” says Galarnyk. Many, like Ontario Minister of Health, Christine Elliott are supporting ‘Go Grey in May’, a national campaign to raise awareness of brain tumours. “We should take this time to recognize all those impacted by brain tumours. I share my heartfelt support to those affected and express gratitude to the wonderful teams supporting them,” says…

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