The effects of the Tripartite Intervention on Students’ Attitudes toward Disability

The effects of the Tripartite Intervention on Students’ Attitudes toward Disability

The effects of the Tripartite Intervention on Students’ Attitudes toward Disability


Dr. John Freer

St. Clair College

 

Contemporary scholarship suggests that students in elementary school have already developed their individual attitudes towards disability, which are typically negative or neutral. Poor attitudes toward disability threaten the very nature of inclusive education, a philosophy that embraces the idea that all students should feel welcome and a part of their class. Inclusive education also comes from a school culture that promotes the value of equity. Fortunately, attitudes can be shaped at young ages and these changes can have lasting effects. 

Among attitudinal research, the tripartite theory of attitude continues to be very popular,  especially among attitude metrics. This theory defines an attitude as equal parts affect,  behaviour, and cognition. Despite the widespread use of tripartite measures of attitude, current intervention programs aimed at enhancing students’ attitudes toward disability in the literature do not explicitly target all three dimensions of attitude. Most studies only target one dimension of attitude, with a few studies targeting two of the three dimensions of attitude

The goal of this project is to continue measuring the effectiveness of the Tripartite Intervention with a larger and more diverse sample.

Related Programs:
Nucleus Cores:

FUNDER:

WE-SPARK Health Institute

GRANT DURATION:

2021-2022

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